EP77 – The Use of Vitamin D Status as a Prognostic Indicator of Thyroid Cancer Stage in Thyroidectomy Patients

     

    Sulibhavi, Anita1; Doros, Gheorghe2; Jalisi, Scharukh M.3; McAneny, David B.4; Doherty, Gerard M.5; Holick, Michael F.6; Noordzij, J. Pieter7
    1 Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
    2 Biostatistics Consulting Group, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA
    3 Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Neurosurgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
    4 Section of Surgical Oncology, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
    5 Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
    6 Department of Medicine, Dermatology and Physiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
    7 Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA

     

    Background: Vitamin D status has recently been of interest as a potential prognostic indicator for thyroid cancer. Vitamin D deficiency has already been associated with increased prevalence and higher staging of breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer. At this time, the research on its exact role in thyroid cancer is inconclusive.

    Objective:
    The primary aim of this study was to examine the relationship between vitamin D status and thyroid cancer staging of patients who underwent thyroidectomy.

    Methods:
     385 patients at Boston Medical Center who underwent thyroidectomy between 2000 and 2015 were examined retrospectively. Any long-standing history of vitamin D deficiency noted in patient charts was recorded. Additionally, each patients’ lowest measured serum 25(OH) vitamin D level from the year prior to thyroidectomy was recorded. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as levels lower than 20 ng/mL.

    Results: 
    The distribution of staging within patients with a history of vitamin D deficiency was significantly different from that within patients without a history of vitamin D deficiency, with a higher proportion of deficient patients having higher-staged thyroid cancer (p = 0.014). When this relationship was examined using measured vitamin D values in year prior to thyroidectomy, no significant correlation was observed (p=0.757).

    Conclusions and Further Studies:
    Our results demonstrated that patients with a longstanding history of vitamin D deficiency were more likely to have a higher staged thyroid cancer. This finding encourages vitamin D supplementation in deficient patients and also supports screening measures for thyroid cancer patients.
    References:

    1. Kim JR, Kim BH, Kim SM, Oh MY, Kim WJ, Jeon YK, et al. Low serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D is associated with poor clinicopathologic characteristics in female patients with papillary thyroid cancer. Thyroid. 2014;24(11):1618–24. doi: 10.1089/thy.2014.0090 .
    2. Roskies M, Dolev Y, Caglar D, Hier MP, Mlynarek A, Majdan A, et al. Vitamin D deficiency as a potentially modifiable risk factor for thyroid cancer. J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2012;41(3):160–3

 

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